Celts, gardening, herbal, history, share the wealth, Witchery

Witch Alert! Free Herbalism webinars, Food timeline

plunger-317747_640https://www.americanherbalistsguild.com/professional-training-webinars

The American Herbalist’s guild has an archive of free webinars (only some with accompanying .pdfs, though)!!  Go look!

Foodtimeline.org

Foodtimeline.org covers everything from water and ice to cronuts.  This is a preserved and (as of 2013) updated work started by the late Lynne Olver.  From the webpage:

Thee Food Timeline was created and maintained solely by Lynne Olver (1958-2015, her obituary), reference librarian with a passion for food history. About it she originally said ” Information is checked against standard reference tools for accuracy. All sources are cited for research purposes. As with most historical topics, there are some conflicting stories in the field of food history. We do our best to select and present the information with the most documented support. Heritage Radio interviews Food Timeline editor (2013).

Here’s a link to what Olver found about Celtic cuisine, ancient and “newer”.

 

Advertisements
gardening, new projects

Cabbages and friends: Indoor #gardening adventures

Ok, so remember those seedlings I just posted about?  Yeah…they’ve continued their verdant madness.

Look at 'em go!
Look at ’em go!

I’ve taken the lid off so they won’t get damaged, and moved them to the aerogarden.   I’m out of nutrient for the tank, so I’m just using the aero for its lights.  And wow.

My cabbage seed babies are starting to drift upright (I want them to have good posture) and my nasturtiums are taking off like a shot.

 

 

5" of nasturtium sprout. I hope they survive to make it outside in May.
5″ of nasturtium sprout. I hope they survive to make it outside in May.

This is the first time I’ve planted these guys, and I hope I have the conditions to let them flourish.  Cabbage, chard, and nasturtiums are new to my garden.  I’m angling for beginner’s luck here.  The marigolds I’ve been doing since I was a kiddo, so I’m not to worried.  But I always get a little nervous when things first start to sprout, especially when the weather is all over the map like it is in March.  Next year, I should probably wait till April.

 

 

 

 

Happy the Garden Gnome watches over all.
Happy the Garden Gnome watches over all.

So here we are, letting the seeds take their course.   Happy is our gnome here.  He was my grandmother’s garden gnome back in the day, but he has since retired to the indoor life, taking care of our kitchens.  I like to keep him near plants, though.  It’s his…field…after all.

I’ll show myself out.

Also on the garden docket are potatoes and dandelions.  The last one was a whim – gathered a head that had gone to seed and figured this should be a piece of cake.  Watch those things kick my butt 😛   The spuds are drying out, ready to get in some dirt.  I’m waiting for payday to get a nice bucket and more soil for them, then they’re ready to go in.  Those I’m excited to try…if I can supply our own potatoes, this will cut down on buying the big Costco bag that we can never quite get through.

Wish me luck!

gardening

Seedlings again…

On the 20th of this month, I started seeds in honor of the equinox.  Now it’s 5 days later and wow….

From left to right - nasturtuim, marigolds, lavender, chard, cabbage, parsley
From left to right – nasturtium, marigolds, lavender, chard, cabbage, parsley

The lavender and parsley don’t seem to be taking, so I’m going to count those as losses and invest in fresher seeds.  The rest, however are going nuts!

I’m not sure if I should start pruning back the cabbage yet.  Something tells me they’re going to be humongous.

In other gardening ventures, I’m going to start some spuds and dandelions.  These two should be pieces of cake to grow.  The potatoes already have nice eyes sprouted, so I’m going to cut them and dry them as per P. Allen Smith’s instructions (I forsee a new planter in my near future).  The dandelions are a whim, however.  Since one can eat the greens….why not harvest all those little seeds and see what happens?  If nothing else, they will be cheerful and yellow.

Next month, I’ll be picking up some herb seedlings from a local show.  They’ll go outside our flat as a “working garden”.  And they will probably be joined by whichever of these guys make it to maturity.  Gonna have my hands full this summer!

Wish me luck, everyone!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
My chard already turning colors!  I can’t wait to see those gorgeous stalks!
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
A nice chunky nasturtium sprout – the package said they’re going to be a brilliant red, but we’ll see!